All posts tagged international ediscovery

Spring Digest: Everything You Need to Know (so far!) in 2017

Ediscovery has been busy this year. We’re only five months in and we’ve already seen developments in predictive coding, proportionality standards and ediscovery practices around the world.

Before you head off on your summer vacation, take a minute to refresh yourself on some of the hottest topics in ediscovery so far this year.

Proportionality is Key

One of the most significant amendments to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure back in 2015 was a new requirement for discovery to be “proportional to the needs of the case.” Today, counsel must ensure that their discovery requests are specific and add value to their case in relation to the accompanying expense.

Australia Gets in the Predictive Coding Game

First the United States, then Ireland and England, and now Australia. Predictive coding (also known as TAR) continues to spread around the world as courts encourage parties to consider technology to discover and inspect documents.

Using Cellebrite in Mobile Phone Investigations

You need not be a computer wizard to appreciate the volumes of relevant data housed on the mobile device in your hand. The standards and technology for extracting mobile device data are still progressing, variable and slightly confusing. KrolLDiscovery’s Jason Bergerson answers common questions around specific technology and processes in mobile phone investigations.

Ediscovery Around the World

Throughout this year, KrolLDiscovery will be diving deep into ediscovery practices around the world. We hope you’ll join us as we explore data collection, privacy, proportionality and production practices in the Americas, EMEA and APAC. So far, we’ve stopped in Australia, Ireland, Canada, the U.K. and Germany to discuss some ediscovery trends in each locale.

Be sure to sign up for updates from The Ediscovery Blog to stay on top of everything ediscovery.

The Luck of the Irish…and Predictive Coding

On this St. Patrick’s Day, it’s opportune to revisit a prominent Irish judicial opinion – in fact, the first known judicial opinion in Europe to endorse predictive coding.

In the spring of 2015, Ireland embraced predictive coding in Irish Bank Resolution Corporation Ltd v. Quinn [2015] IEHC 175, a case holding that, in the discovery of large data sets, technology assisted review (TAR) using predictive coding is at least as accurate as, and probably more accurate than, the manual or linear method of identifying relevant documents.

The judgment is a great read for predictive coding pundits and a shining endorsement of the potential benefits of this technology. Specifically, the court held that:

  • The rules of court in Ireland do not require a manual document review to be carried out;
  • The evidence establishes that in discovery of large data sets, TAR using predictive coding is at least as accurate as, and probably more accurate than, the manual or linear method in identifying relevant documents;
  • As TAR combines man and machine, the process must contain appropriate checks and balances which render each stage capable of independent verification. The parties need to agree to these;
  • Provided the process has sufficient transparency, TAR using predictive coding discharges a party’s discovery obligations;
  • Predictive coding will save time and money if used to refine a data set and to limit the pool of documents to be manually reviewed. It was projected that 10% of the 680,809 documents would need to be manually reviewed after employing predictive coding, as compared to the traditional linear review estimate that required a team of 10 experienced reviewers, a nine month time frame and a cost of two million Euros; and
  • Parties should first agree to the use of predictive coding, run agreed upon keyword searches to initially refine the data set and then use predictive coding subject to agreed-upon checks and balances. Documents suggested by the software as being potentially relevant should then be reviewed manually by a human review team.

The ruling addressed major concerns expressed about predictive coding and sought to sway the skeptics. It unequivocally stated that predictive coding will save time and money. Although there is no specific reference to proportionality in Irish law, the judgment stated that cost should not be a barrier on access to justice.

The Irish opinion relied significantly on Judge Peck’s Da Silva Moore opinion, setting the predictive coding tone in the United States in 2012. A year after Ireland’s Quinn opinion, the UK would celebrate its first judicial opinion referencing predictive coding when the English High Court issued Pyrrho Investments Ltd. v. MWB Property Ltd. [2016] EWHC 256 (Ch). In that case, Master Matthews estimated that predictive coding would offer significant cost savings and that the possible disclosure of over two million documents done via traditional manual review would be disproportionate and “unreasonable.” Late in 2016, Australia joined the list of countries tackling predictive coding issues when Justice Vickery from the Supreme Court of the State of Victoria issued a key opinion in McConnell Dowell Constructors v. Santam.

As we continue through 2017, what country will be next to focus on predictive coding? Don’t miss any development; subscribe to KrolLDiscovery’s weekly email updates.

Canada: A Close-knit Ediscovery Community, Continuously Embracing New Technology

In 2017, KrolLDiscovery will be diving deep into ediscovery practices around the world. Tour with us as we explore data collection, privacy, proportionality and production practices in the Americas, EMEA and APAC.

A couple weeks ago, we travelled to the Land Down Under to learn about predictive coding practices in Australia. Our next stop: Canada, where we find that Canada is leading the way on cooperative ediscovery.

What role does ediscovery technology play in Canadian litigation matters?

Ediscovery practices in Canada closely align to analogous processes, principles and goals in the United States and the United Kingdom. For example, Canadian parties and their counsel are seeking to collect, process, review and produce electronic documents as quickly and efficiently as possible. To achieve that goal, many law firms have implemented in-house ediscovery technologies to be able to support their clients’ litigation needs. Some firms and corporations, on the other hand, also take advantage of the close-knit ediscovery community in Canada and choose to work with an ediscovery provider in a managed services capacity. Akin to the United States, many law firms are continuously re-evaluating current technologies and looking for new solutions as the cloud opens new avenues for conducting ediscovery faster and possibly cheaper without sacrificing security.

What is unique about ediscovery in Canada?

In Canada there is not a large body of ediscovery case law like in the United States or even the United Kingdom. In fact, a prominent judicial opinion referencing predictive coding or Technology Assisted Review has yet to be handed down. Instead, legal teams rely on practices and guidelines such as those found in The Sedona Canada Principles or Ontario Rules of Civil Procedure 29.1.03. Furthermore, the Ontario Ediscovery Implementation Committee (EIC) released a series of model documents to help guide litigants through the ediscovery process, including a Discovery Agreement, Preservation Agreement, Checklist for Preparing a Discovery Plan and a Proportionality Chart.

Specifically, when talking with Canadian ediscovery gurus, there is a general sense that Canada leads the global ediscovery community in terms of cooperation and proportionality, with many practitioners stating that developing ediscovery parameters with opposing counsel or regulators is simply more collaborative when compared to ediscovery matters in other jurisdictions.

What are some obstacles to ediscovery in Canada?

In some aspects of legal technology, the Canadian legal system is still playing catch-up, especially when it comes to the technically complex areas of ediscovery, trial presentation or technology in the courtroom. For example, there are factions of early-adopters embracing predictive coding in document review. However, despite the well-established benefits, the majority of legal teams are reluctant to leverage artificial intelligence to categorize documents.

Over the next few years, document review workflows will modernize as additional Canadian legal teams become more experienced with new technology such as predictive coding. This will be increasingly important in the antitrust practice area, where regulators are starting to adopt broader policies similar to U.S. antitrust protocols. The need for predictive coding will increase if parties in antitrust matters need to sift through additional volumes of documents.

How often do Canadian legal teams transfer data to the United States or Europe for ediscovery?

Canadian legal teams are continuously evaluating the needs of the specific matter and comparing risks and benefits of conducting ediscovery in Canada versus elsewhere. Many corporations in Canada have U.S. offices; so often, Canadian litigation has a U.S. based component and ediscovery documents easily cross borders. However, sometimes legal teams are reluctant to transfer data to the United States for ediscovery processing, hosting and review because of the potential impact on other pending cases or the importance of privacy in the matter. Legal teams in Canada understand that ediscovery is available in the global marketplace and should the availability of technology, ability to deliver under tight time frames or need for a large pool of document reviewers demand resources outside of Canada, parties will consider transferring subsets of data to the United States or Europe.

How does language impact ediscovery in Canada?

Many cases contain documents in both English and French; accordingly, legal teams often require document review teams comprised of bilingual Canadian lawyers fluent in English and French. This sometimes drives up the costs associated with review, placing more importance on advanced search and analytics technologies that increase document review speeds and effectiveness.

Looking to stay up to speed on global ediscovery practices? Don’t miss this whitepaper, “A Practical Guide to Cross-Border Ediscovery.”

Australia Gets in the Predictive Coding Game

G’day, mate!

As we have said before, predictive coding (also known as Technology Assisted Review or TAR) is taking the globe by storm. First the United States, then Ireland and England, and now Australia. Ediscovery practitioners take heed: significant predictive coding developments are afoot in Australia.

(Special Note: If you are looking to stay informed on ediscovery around the world, don’t miss this whitepaper, “A Practical Guide to Cross-Border Ediscovery.”)

Predictive Coding: From New York City to the Australian Outback

Late last year, Australia joined the list of countries tackling predictive coding issues when Justice Vickery from the Supreme Court of the State of Victoria issued a key opinion in McConnell Dowell Constructors v. Santam.

In this case, the parties faced massive costs to review 1,400,000 documents, and they could not agree on a review method. Justice Vickery appointed a Special Referee to deliver a report to the court addressing the appropriate management of discovery in the proceeding. Relying on previous TAR decisions from the U.S. and Europe, as well as the Special Referee’s recommendation to use TAR, the court approved predictive coding as an effective method of document review when “the cost of traditional discovery processes in a case such as this dictates that [such processes] are not appropriate.”

Notably, the McConnell opinion made it clear that the courts, not the parties, would have the final determination in whether predictive coding will be employed in civil proceedings in Victoria state court. Specifically, Justice Vickery held that “the Court may order discovery by technology assisted review, whether or not it is consented to by the parties” in cases where the volume of ESI is substantial and “the costs of research may not be reasonable and proportionate.”

However, McConnell was not Victorian litigators’ first exposure to TAR in the courtroom. Three months before the McConnell decision, the Supreme Court of Victoria released a Standard Operating Procedure (TEC SOP 5 [TAR]) to provide litigants with interim measures for using TAR in construction and engineering cases. On January 30, 2017, the court replaced TEC SOP 5 with Technology in Civil Litigation Practice Note SC Gen 5, opening up TAR for general use in Victoria’s commercial courts.

Consent or No Consent: That is the Predictive Coding Question

While predictive coding is gaining traction as an effective tool to tackle massive document sets, there is no bright line on whether a party can be required to use TAR. Contrary to the holding in McConnell, U.S. courts have not compelled parties to leverage TAR. In 2016, two key opinions, Hyles v. New York City, 2016 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 100390 (S.D.N.Y. Aug. 1, 2016), and In re Viagra (Sildenafil Citrate) Prods. Liab. Litig., 2016 BL 347130 (N.D. Cal. Oct. 14, 2016), acknowledged the efficiencies associated with predictive coding, but refused to force a party to leverage the cutting-edge technology. That being said, U.S. attorneys need to be prepared that the days of insisting on manual review may one day soon be bygone. As noted by Judge Peck in Hyles, “[t]here may come a time when . . . it might be unreasonable for a party to refuse to use TAR . . . [but][w]e are not there yet.”

What’s Next for the Land Down Under?

Victoria is not the only state in Australia getting in on the ediscovery action. Courts in New South Wales abide by their state Supreme Court’s 2008 Practice Note No. SC Gen & for Use of Technology encouraging parties to consider technology to discover and inspect documents. While this practice note and other similar guidance in the Australian federal court system do not specifically reference TAR, savvy Australian practitioners know that this will likely change in the near future.

Looking to stay up to speed on global ediscovery practices? Don’t miss this whitepaper, “A Practical Guide to Cross-Border Ediscovery.”

January 2017 Ediscovery Case Summaries

Failure to Preserve Interactive Website Data Held Insufficient to Impose Sanctions Under Rule 37(e)
FTC v. Directv, Inc., 2016 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 176873 (N.D. Cal. Dec. 21, 2016)

Jury to Decide Issue of Intent for Spoliation
Cahill v. Dart, 2016 U.S. Dist. Lexis 166831 (N.D. Ill. Dec. 2, 2016)

Australian Court Takes Predictive Coding Down Under
McConnell Dowell Constructors (Aust) Pty Ltd v. Santam Ltd & Ors (No 1),
[2016] VSC 734 (Dec. 2, 2016)

Illinois State Court Leverages Proportionality Standards in FRCP 26(b)(1) to Determine if Forensic Imaging is too Intrusive
Carlson v. Jerousek, 2016 IL App (2d) 151248 (Ill. App. Ct. 2d Dist. 2016)

Kansas Court Rejects Proportionality Arguments and Boilerplate Objections
Duffy v. Lawrence Mem. Hosp., 2016 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 176848 (D. Kan. Dec. 21, 2016)

Crossing Borders: Where Discovery and Privacy Collide

international ediscovery

Litigation teams face new challenges when an ediscovery project crosses borders – from multilingual data and unique cultural norms to unfamiliar laws, regulations and data privacy practices. In addition, the international data protection landscape is changing and U.S. businesses with global operations need to be prepared. Companies need to think carefully about the risks of transferring data across borders.

To help practitioners navigate these challenges, Kroll Ontrack synthesized information on more than seventeen countries to create a succinct, new guidebook, A Practical Guide to Cross-Border Ediscovery: Insights for U.S. Lawyers.

This guide includes practical insights into how organizations all over the world are managing a wide range of business challenges using ediscovery technology, including:

  • Case studies on cross-border litigation and FCPA investigations;
  • An “At a Glance” visual map that shows the legal system, applicable rules and ediscovery practices for key countries in the Americas, EMEA and APAC regions;
  • Short summaries from experts on the ediscovery landscape in key countries; and
  • A timeline of EU Data Privacy and Protection milestones.

Litigation, compliance demands and investigations are part of the regular course of business for U.S. lawyers. With global considerations and cross-border implications, law firms and companies now rely on mobile ediscovery technologies, in-country data centers and local expertise to empower the processing and transferring of data in a compliant and cost-effective manner. This guide is just one way that Kroll Ontrack is here to help attorneys and their counsel thrive and adapt in a changing ediscovery world. Read the new cross-border guide today.

Ediscovery in China: Traditions, Rules and Customs You Need to Know

Ediscovery in China

On June 22, Kroll Ontrack managing director and APAC ediscovery expert Kate Chan will discuss the Chinese ediscovery landscape, so you will be prepared when you need to know the traditions, rules and customs when faced with a regulatory investigation or cross-border litigation.

Register today to learn about Ediscovery in China!

Ediscovery in China: Traditions, Rules and Customs You Don’t Know

The Chinese legal landscape is often seen as daunting and secretive; a laborious task for an American legal professional to master. Specifically, Chinese data protection and privacy laws in particular provide a challenge to any international ediscovery project. Because of the substantial economic growth resulting in higher volumes of data in China, as well as the expanding complexities of ediscovery law, a practitioner that is not familiar with Chinese law can find themselves at a significant disadvantage, especially when faced with a regulatory investigation or cross-border litigation.

To help you meet these unique challenges head on, we’ve enlisted seasoned APAC ediscovery expert Kate Chan to offer the information and strategies you need to manage Chinese ediscovery.

Specifically, this webinar will cover:

  • The implication of China’s regulatory framework on ediscovery
  • Recent developments in Chinese ediscovery practices
  • Tips for managing the unique issues related to managing ESI in China
  • Ways Chinese ediscovery differs from ediscovery practices in other APAC countries

Click here to get more information about this webinar and to register.

Kate Chan is a New York attorney who started practicing on Wall Street. She is a native of Hong Kong and is fluent in both Mandarin and Cantonese. She is the Regional Managing Director of Kroll Ontrack’s Legal Technologies unit in Asia Pacific.

UK High Court Approves the Use of Predictive Coding in Litigation

UK Predictive Coding

Legal technology providers in the UK have a lot to celebrate as the English High Court recently approved the use of predictive coding for disclosure in litigation.

The judgment, handed down by Master Matthews in Pyrrho Investments Ltd. v. MWB Property Ltd. [2016] EWHC 256 (Ch), gave official judicial authorization for the use of predictive coding in High Court proceedings. Summing up his decision, Master Matthews stated that predictive coding is just as accurate, if not more so than a manual review using keyword searches, mirroring the sentiments shared by Judge Peck’s 2012 opinion in Da Silva Moore v. Publicis Groupe regarding the appropriateness of predictive coding and its potential benefits. Master Matthews also estimated that predictive coding would offer significant cost savings in this particular case and that the possible disclosure of over two million documents done via traditional manual review would be disproportionate and “unreasonable.”

To read a short summary of the judgment, please click here, or read the judgment in full here.

Predictive Coding Goes Global

Predictive coding has become a global phenomenon over the past few years. The United States and Ireland have led the way in giving judicial approval to predictive coding, with Judge Peck’s Da Silva Moore opinion setting the predictive coding tone in 2012. Since then, the United States has continued to adopt the use of predictive coding, with a number of substantive cases further establishing its use. Ireland recently embraced predictive coding as well in the 2015 Irish Bank Resolution Corporation Ltd & ors v. Quinn & ors case holding that, in the discovery of large data sets, technology-assisted review using predictive coding is at least as accurate as, and probably more accurate than, the manual or linear method of identifying relevant documents. Not surprisingly, the Pyrrho judgment in the UK references these cases in detail.

Combatting Predictive Coding Objections

Despite these cases and the ever-increasing sophistication of the technology itself, the UK law community has been somewhat reluctant to make use of the technology, as explored in this study by Kroll Ontrack Legal Consultant and former litigation lawyer Hitesh Chowdhry. In Chowdhry’s white paper, “Rage against the Machine; Attitudes to Predictive Coding Amongst UK Lawyers,” he notes that his study revealed that the main barriers to adopting predictive coding technology were:

  • Risk aversion and mistrust of the technology’s accuracy
  • Belief that predictive coding would have a negative effect on revenue
  • Satisfaction with existing methods and a belief that existing practices offered more accuracy than studies have suggested
  • Insufficient understanding and knowledge of the complex predictive coding process
  • Diffusion among professionals

The UK Pyrrho judgment counters many of the fears uncovered in Chowdhry’s study by stating that the technology is accurate and offers cost savings. The efficiency of TAR and the cost savings offered by predictive coding will undoubtedly be popular with clients and potentially will give a competitive edge in winning work. Hopefully, this ruling will encourage more UK firms to take advantage of the benefits offered by predictive coding.

For more information about this technology, read Kroll Ontrack’s e-book, “Mastering Predictive Coding: The Ultimate Guide.”

Explore the Global Expansion of Ediscovery

Ediscovery is in the midst of global change. Even for countries with legal frameworks that don’t require parties to disclose electronic documents, global ediscovery is emerging as a critical component of business and corporate governance.

Kroll Ontrack experts created a new, interactive map to help you explore global ediscovery insights. Organized by nation and theme, Ediscovery Goes Global: 2016 Trends” explores the influence of data privacy laws and regulations, cyber security concerns, advancements in computer forensics and the evolution of technology assisted review around the world.

  • Have you ever wondered what the largest emerging market in ediscovery is?
  • How, why and when does ediscovery activity increase in the Netherlands?
  • Where is the use of predictive coding expanding?
  • Ever wondered how China deals with data protection and privacy in ediscovery?
  • Coming out of significant recessions, will Spain & Italy’s use of ediscovery technologies and techniques expand?
  • How do computer forensic tools influence ediscovery in France?
  • Which APAC countries are seeing the most ediscovery growth?

Click here to explore the map and learn more about trends in the hottest emerging ediscovery markets.

It’s Your Turn! Vote Today for the National Law Journal’s ‘Best of 2016’

The polls are open, and it’s awards season. Whatever your persuasion, it’s your turn to vote. The National Law Journal recently announced the finalists for its ‘Best of 2016,’ and Kroll Ontrack is proud to be nominated in NINE categories!

  • Best end-to-end litigation consulting firm
  • Best end-to-end ediscovery provider
  • Best technology assisted review ediscovery solution
  • Best data and technology management ediscovery provider
  • Best data recovery solution provider
  • Best managed document review services
  • Best managed ediscovery and litigation support services provider
  • Best online review platform
  • Best case management software

From now until Friday, February 5, you can vote in the annual reader’s choice survey. This is your chance to rate the products and services you’ve been using in litigation. And it’s an opportunity for those of us in the industry to receive valuable feedback.

While you don’t have to answer every question, we greatly appreciate your support and your feedback – thank you for taking the time!

It’s time to vote.

 
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